For North Korean women, freedom in China can mean sex-trafficking

Tim Peters, a human rights activist and the founder of Helping Hands, speaks during a protest in front of the foreign ministry in Seoul, South Korea, in 2007.

Tim Peters, a human rights activist and the founder of Helping Hands, speaks during a protest in front of the foreign ministry in Seoul, South Korea, in 2007.

For many women who flee from North Korea into China, their futures are dependent upon the sex-trafficking market in China. Often sold to men who are disabled or elderly, these vulnerable women can be forced into situations that are far from the freedom they imagined.  

The South China Morning Post article features an interview with Miyoung, who was coerced into “choosing a husband” once sold to smugglers.

“[The couple] did everything to convince me that living with a Chinese man was my best choice to help my family back in North Korea,” she said. “They took me to the homes of various disabled or handicapped men in China for me to choose who I wanted to live with.

“I wept bitterly. I knew the punishment that awaited me in North Korea would be severe since I’d left without permission.”

 

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